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Competitive or unfair advantage? Modified Controllers

by Nicholas Holden (Holden ZA)  Posted Wednesday, February 13, 2013 12:21:00 PM

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As the competitive console community grows so does the knowledge of equipment available on the market. This equipment is always used in the attempt to gain the competitive advantage. One of the biggest questions is: When does the competitive advantage turn into the unfair advantage? This question often gets brought up at competitive events, where it is left to the organizers to draw the line on what they believe is fair. One of the biggest debates currently is whether equipment like Scuff and Razer controllers and even additions to controllers like FPS Freaks should be allowed on the competitive scene. 

The main features that have caused concern, with the two aforementioned controllers, is that they have extra paddles/triggers on the remote. With the Scuff Controllers there are two to four additional paddles that are placed on the back. This allows players to have quicker access to buttons that previously would require the player to remove their thumb off the right analog stick. The Razer has a similar function: the Razer Onza has additional buttons next to the top bumpers of the controller and the Razer Sabertooth having extra buttons at the back of the controllers. The FPS (First Person Shooter) Freaks allow players to extend the length of the analog stick, this allows for an increased amount of sensitivity on the controller. 

Scuf-back.jpg  

These features are a a hot topic for debate among console players and tournament organizers. Where both players and organizers are split in their views of whether these controllers, with added features, should be allowed or tolerated. One of the arguments against the controllers is that they offer one player with an advantage that is not accessible for other gamers using a traditional styled remote. The counter argument is that the modified controllers don't add any new functions, they just make some buttons more accessible.

Rzr_Sabertooth_05-580-100.jpg  

At first I found myself against the idea of playing against players using controllers that had a better functionality than mine. However, there are options for players whom have normal Xbox/PlayStation controllers to be able to do exactly what players with Scuffs can. This method is known as the claw grip, and allows players with traditional Xbox/PlayStation controllers to do the moves that modded controllers can. This then leads itself to the question if modded controllers really have that much of a benefit, if a traditional control can do the same as the modded one.

What is your opinion? Do you believe modded controllers, that allow players to have better accessibility to buttons should be banned? 

Let us know by commenting below or hitting us up on Facebook or Twitter. 

Holden's Twitter  MWEB GameZoneTwitter Facebook

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Please note that the opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not MWEB Connect (Pty) Ltd


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Rzr_Sabertooth_05-580-100.jpg  Scuf-back.jpg 

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